MRSA

 

This 2005 colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted numerous clumps of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, commonly referred to by the acronym, MRSA; Magnified 4780. Recently recognized outbreaks, or clusters of MRSA in community settings have been associated with strains that have some unique microbiologic and genetic properties, compared with the traditional hospital-based MRSA strains, which suggests some biologic properties, e.g., virulence factors like toxins, may allow the community strains to spread more easily, or cause more skin disease. A common strain named USA300-0114 has caused many such of outbreaks in the United States. See PHIL 7820 for a black and white version of this image.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, e.g., bloodstream, pneumonia, bone infections, occur most frequently among persons in hospitals and healthcare facilities, including nursing homes, and dialysis centers. Those who acquire a MRSA infection usually have a weakened immune system, however, the manifestation of MRSA infections that are acquired by otherwise healthy individuals, who have not been recently hospitalized, or had a medical procedure such as dialysis, or surgery, first began to emerged in the mid- to late-1990's. These infections in the community are usually manifested as minor skin infections such as pimples and boils. Transmission of MRSA has been reported most frequently in certain populations, e.g., children, sports participants, or jail inmates.

Source: CDC

 

MRSA:  Created on September 9th, 2007.  Last Modified on November 4th, 2009

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