Norovirus (previously called "Norwalk-like viruses"), is an RNA virus of the Caliciviridae taxonomic family. The virus causes approximately 90% of epidemic non-bacterial outbreaks of gastroenteritis around the world, and is responsible for 50% of all foodborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the US.  Norovirus affects people of all ages. The viruses are transmitted by fecally contaminated food or water and by person-to-person contact.

After infection, immunity to norovirus is usually incomplete and temporary. There is an inherited predisposition to infection, and individuals with blood type O are more often infected, while blood types B and AB can confer partial immunity.

Outbreaks of norovirus disease often occur in closed or semi-closed communities, such as long-term care facilities, hospitals, prisons, dormitories, and cruise ships where once the virus has been introduced, the infection spreads very rapidly by either person-to-person transmission or through contaminated food. Many norovirus outbreaks have been traced to food that was handled by one infected person.

Norovirus is rapidly inactivated by chlorine-based disinfectants, but because the virus particle does not have a lipid envelope, it is less susceptible to alcohols and detergents.

There are different genogroups of norovirus and the majority of noroviruses that infect humans are classified into genogroup G1 and G2.

 

[Source: Wikipedia]
 

 

Norovirus Facts:  Created on January 30th, 2009.  Last Modified on January 30th, 2009

0 Comments

You must be logged in to comment:

Forgot your password?   Don't have an account?

CIRIscience.org Account Registration

Fill in the form below for basic site access (commenting, etc).
Looking for more? Become a CIRI Member...