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Did You Know?

 

Mop Bucket Liquid - Cleaning or Polluting?

 

"Bucket solutions become contaminated almost immediately during cleaning, and continued use of the solution transfers increasing numbers of microorganisms to each subsequent surface to be cleaned."

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) "Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities."

Article

What is Log Reduction?

 

By CIRI Staff

 

"Log reduction" is a mathematical term (as is "log increase") used to show the relative number of live microbes eliminated from a surface by disinfecting or cleaning.

 

For example, a "5-log reduction" means lowering the number of microorganisms by 100,000-fold, that is, if a surface has 100,000 pathogenic microbes on it, a 5-log reduction would reduce the number of microorganisms to one.

 

Log Reductions

  • 1 log reduction means the number of germs is 10 times smaller
  • 2 log reduction means the number of germs is 100 times smaller
  • 3 log reduction means the number of germs is 1000 times smaller
  • 4 log reduction means the number of germs is 10,000 times smaller
  • 5 log reduction means the number of germs is 100,000 times smaller
  • 6 log reduction means the number of germs is 1,000,000 times smaller
  • 7 log reduction means the number of germs is 10,000,000 times smaller

 

What is Log Reduction?:  Created on June 22nd, 2008.  Last Modified on June 22nd, 2008
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The Cleaning Industry Research Institute (CIRI) is a 501.c.3 not-for-profit scientific, educational and research organization that applies science to the practice and improvement of cleaning and maintenance.

 

This abstract/brief is presented under the recognized "fair use" doctrine with respect to article copyright and intellectual property. Readers are encouraged to secure the full article from the originating publication source. Articles also may be obtained through a librarian, an information specialist or inter-library loan. In cases where payment is required under copyright it can be processed through a reference library or the Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com.

 

CIRI provides no warranty, expressed or implied, and assumes no legal liability for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information disclosed on its site. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of CIRI principals, executives, science advisors or affiliates.

 

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